State of North Dakota secondary Archives: on Government Reform


Michael Coachman: Size of government & regulations should be limited

Federal, state and local governments should be transparent and limited to their respective roles, in accordance with the Tenth Amendment. The size of government, government regulations, and entitlement and transfer programs, should be limited to essential, inherently governmental functions.
Source: 2020 North Dakota gubernatorial campaign website Mar 25, 2020

Doug Burgum: Online state services should work like consumer sites

A positive experience online is important for people that are living in the state regardless of age. Today that experience is you go to 187 different sites. One of the things that we have to do is to reinvent the online experience, to match the consumer experiences that all of you have, which is you go to places and when you go back, they know who you are you shouldn't have to be re-entering your credit card information dozens of times every time you interact with the State of North Dakota.
Source: 2020 North Dakota State of the State address Jan 29, 2020

Michael Coachman: Work with tribal leaders to resolve concerns over voter ID

Perhaps the most prominent issue at the moment in regards to this race is the controversy surrounding voter ID, with the Supreme Court's recent ruling in favor of North Dakota's law. Coachman says that it's important to ensure that only legal North Dakota residents vote in our elections, but that tribal relations must be improved. He would work with tribal leaders to resolve concerns about voter suppression.
Source: The MinuteMan Blog on 2020 North Dakota Gubernatorial race Oct 27, 2018

Michael Coachman: Make acquiring absentee ballots easier

Coachman said he jumped into the Secretary of State race to promote transparency and visibility of the office. The retired Air Force veteran from Larimore said he tries "to help the underdog." He was previously a lieutenant governor candidate in 2012 and 2016.

"I'm doing it because I like to serve the people; I believe in the Constitution," Coachman said. "When I raised my hand, I swore to defend this nation." He also sees technology as an issue: "Our system should just be totally independent, where no one should have access to it except North Dakota." He also expressed concerns for the secretary of state's website, such as repetitive data entry and acquiring absentee ballots. "It is not the easiest," Coachman said.

Coachman indicated he would visit cities and counties to meet with residents, even do radio broadcasts for outreach. Not everyone communicates the same way, he said.

Source: Bismarck Tribune on 2020 North Dakota Gubernatorial race Oct 18, 2018

Heidi Heitkamp: Reverse Citizens United by constitutional amendment

Q: Require political ads to disclose their largest funders?

Kevin Cramer (R): No. Disclosure individual contributions, but "what other organizations, liberal & conservative, do to promote their beliefs is up to them."

Heidi Heitkamp (D): Yes. Sponsored 2018 DISCLOSE Act. "North Dakotans deserve to know who's trying to influence our elections."

Q: Support Citizens United decision, allowing unlimited political donations from corporations & unions?

Kevin Cramer (R): Yes.

Heidi Heitkamp (D): No. Reverse by constitutional amendment. "Billionaires who couldn't pick out North Dakota on a map shouldn't have more" electoral sway "than hard-working North Dakotans."

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on North Dakota Senate race Oct 9, 2018

Heidi Heitkamp: Opposes voter ID; they target minorities & youth

Q: Voting Rights: Support stricter voting rules like voter ID requirements even if prevent some people from voting?

Kevin Cramer (R): Unknown. When asked about ND voting laws, deferred to state Republican Party for comment.

Heidi Heitkamp (D): No. Has criticized unnecessary voter ID laws in ND that "clearly target" Native Americans & students.

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on North Dakota Senate race Oct 9, 2018

Kevin Cramer: No disclosure of corporate campaign donations

Q: Require political ads to disclose their largest funders?

Kevin Cramer (R): No. Disclose individual contributions, but "what other organizations, liberal & conservative, do to promote their beliefs is up to them."

Heidi Heitkamp (D): Yes. Sponsored 2018 DISCLOSE Act. "North Dakotans deserve to know who's trying to influence our elections."

Q: Support Citizens United decision, allowing unlimited political donations from corporations & unions?

Kevin Cramer (R): Yes.

Heidi Heitkamp (D): No. Reverse by constitutional amendment. "Billionaires who couldn't pick out North Dakota on a map shouldn't have more" electoral sway "than hard-working North Dakotans."

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on North Dakota Senate race Oct 9, 2018

Thomas Campbell: Cut bureaucracy and red tape

Tom's career as a successful businessman is why he understands how North Dakota can compete in the 21st century economy. He knows North Dakota has a tremendous opportunity to diversify its economy in areas like technology, health care and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), but we need the right policies in Washington to help us grow. Tom will cut the bureaucracy and red tape and help our new businesses grow.
Source: 2018 North Dakota Senatorial websiteTomForNorthDakota.com Oct 1, 2017

Doug Burgum: Veto $5,000 limits on executive branch bonuses

Gov. Doug Burgum's first use of his veto powers might also result in the first time he's overruled by lawmakers. HB 1153, a response to what many saw as exorbitant bonuses issued by former Gov. Jack Dalrymple, would have limited future executive branch bonuses to $5,000. Burgum vetoed the bill, saying it "violates the constitutional exercise of executive authority to manage state agencies."

Lawmakers could overturn his veto. It takes just a two-thirds vote in each chamber to do so. This bill passed 91-1 in the House and 36-10 in the Senate. Lawmakers were peeved when Burgum railed against an alleged "good old boys" club in Bismarck. They might see this as their opportunity for a bit of revenge.

Follow-up: House lawmakers voted 84-7 to override the Governor on House Bill 1153 on March 29. The Senate failed to override Gov. Burgum's veto on March 30, with 13 of 47 senators voting to override the veto.

Source: Grand Forks Herald on North Dakota voting record HB 1153 Mar 29, 2017

Jack Dalrymple: OpEd: Legislative $5,000 limit on governor's executive bonus

Gov. Doug Burgum's first use of his veto powers might also result in the first time he's overruled by lawmakers. HB 1153, a response to what many saw as exorbitant bonuses issued by former Gov. Jack Dalrymple, would have limited future executive branch bonuses to $5,000. Burgum vetoed the bill, saying it "violates the constitutional exercise of executive authority to manage state agencies."

Lawmakers could overturn his veto. It takes just a two-thirds vote in each chamber to do so. This bill passed 91-1 in the House and 36-10 in the Senate. Lawmakers were peeved when Burgum railed against an alleged "good old boys" club in Bismarck. They might see this as their opportunity for a bit of revenge.

Follow-up: House lawmakers voted 84-7 to override the Governor on House Bill 1153 on March 29. The Senate failed to override Gov. Burgum's veto on March 30, with 13 of 47 senators voting to override the veto.

Source: Grand Forks Herald on North Dakota voting record HB 1153 Mar 29, 2017

Rick Becker: Voted YES on $5,000 limit on governor's executive bonus

Gov. Doug Burgum's first use of his veto powers might also result in the first time he's overruled by lawmakers. HB 1153, a response to what many saw as exorbitant bonuses issued by former Gov. Jack Dalrymple, would have limited future executive branch bonuses to $5,000. Burgum vetoed the bill, saying it "violates the constitutional exercise of executive authority to manage state agencies."

Lawmakers could overturn his veto. It takes just a two-thirds vote in each chamber to do so. This bill passed 91-1 in the House and 36-10 in the Senate. Lawmakers were peeved when Burgum railed against an alleged "good old boys" club in Bismarck. They might see this as their opportunity for a bit of revenge.

Follow-up: House lawmakers voted 84-7 to override the Governor on House Bill 1153 on March 29. The Senate failed to override Gov. Burgum's veto on March 30, with 13 of 47 senators voting to override the veto. [Rep. Becker voted YEA on 3/29]

Source: Grand Forks Herald on North Dakota voting record HB 1153 Mar 29, 2017

Thomas Campbell: Voted NO on $5,000 limit on governor's executive bonus

Gov. Doug Burgum's first use of his veto powers might also result in the first time he's overruled by lawmakers. HB 1153, a response to what many saw as exorbitant bonuses issued by former Gov. Jack Dalrymple, would have limited future executive branch bonuses to $5,000. Burgum vetoed the bill, saying it "violates the constitutional exercise of executive authority to manage state agencies."

Lawmakers could overturn his veto. It takes just a two-thirds vote in each chamber to do so. This bill passed 91-1 in the House and 36-10 in the Senate. Lawmakers were peeved when Burgum railed against an alleged "good old boys" club in Bismarck. They might see this as their opportunity for a bit of revenge.

Follow-up: House lawmakers voted 84-7 to override the Governor on House Bill 1153 on March 29. The Senate failed to override Gov. Burgum's veto on March 30, with 13 of 47 senators voting to override the veto. [Sen. Campbell voted NAY on 3/30]

Source: Grand Forks Herald on North Dakota voting record HB 1153 Mar 29, 2017

Eliot Glassheim: Regulate campaign contributions from corporations and unions

Q: Do you support the regulation of indirect campaign contributions from corporations and unions?

A: Yes.

Source: VoteSmart 2016 North Dakota Political Courage Test Aug 8, 2016

Robert Marquette: Give SCOTUS nominees an up-or-down vote

There has been a lot of political rhetoric out of Washington recently regarding Merrick Garland's nomination to the SCOTUS. Establishment republicans, like John Hoeven, have spent the last 5 years circumventing budget sequesters, blasting through spending caps, waging illegal wars and destroying our economy. Now that we are entering an election cycle, suddenly they play like they are concerned with preserving the rights of Americans and the Constitution.

I searched the web for Senator Hoeven's position on the subject, and as expected, I found nothing. Dead silence. Apparently the good Senator is hiding in a corner somewhere waiting for someone to give him permission to say something or tell him what to think.

While Senator Hoeven plays it safe, this partisan drama only fuels the political partisanship that divides the people. Enough of the games. Give Merrick Garland an up or down vote on the floor of the Senate.

Source: 2016 North Dakota Senate campaign web RobertForSenate.org Mar 16, 2016

Robert Marquette: Shed light on entrenched political corruption and cronyism

Marquette received the North Dakota Libertarian Party endorsement at its convention in November in Mandan. "If elected, I will fight for sound monetary policy, I will shed light on the corruption and cronyism of the entrenched political parties, and I will always work to drastically reduce government's influence in our lives," Marquette said in a press release.
Source: Bismarck Tribune on 2016 North Dakota Senate race Feb 22, 2016

Doug Burgum: Pledge to support term limits

MY PLEDGE
Source: 2016 North Dakota governor campaign website DougBurgum.com Feb 2, 2016

Jack Dalrymple: Change restrictions for Voter ID

Excerpts from legislation: HB 1333: Amends Valid Forms of Voter Identification: