State of Alabama Archives: on Civil Rights


Lynda Blanchard: Radical attempts to force transgender agenda an abomination

April 26: Thank you Governor Kay Ivey for delivering a win for the people of Alabama. The Dems radical attempts to force their transgender agenda on our State and Country is an abomination and this sends a clear message that we put our conservative values first.
Source: Facebook posting for 2022 Alabama Senate race May 9, 2021

Lynda Blanchard: No one can choose gender because God made that choice

Perhaps the policy initiative that carries the most potential for lasting and long-term damage to our nation is the radical "transgender" agenda. Nobody gets to choose whether we are men or women because God already made that choice for us long before birth.
Source: Yellow Hammer News on 2022 Alabama Senate race Apr 1, 2021

Terri Sewell: Backed Congressional Medal for 1963 church bombing victims

The murder of Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley, shook the nation. But it wasn't until 2013--50 years after the Ku Klux Klan bombing--that the victims were officially acknowledged for their sacrifice with what Sewell described as, "the highest civilian honor that Congress can bestow upon anyone." Sewell was the sponsor of a bill that posthumously awarded a Congressional Gold Medal to the girls, an action that came as the result of a sense of personal duty.
Source: NBC Boston on 2022 Alabama Senate race Feb 24, 2021

John Merrill: 2016: Recognized by the ACLU as the Champion for Democracy

Source: ACLU on Secretary of State website: 2022 Alabama Senate race Jan 23, 2021

Tommy Tuberville: Don't use race to divide us

Q: Is racism a threat to domestic security in the United States? Why or why not?

A: I think the Democratic Party openly encourages hostility between races in this country by using inflammatory language to divide us. Racism is inexcusable and I never have or will condone it. I have always taught it isn't your race that makes you who you are, but who you are on the inside. Good and evil come in all shapes and colors, and when there is discrimination by any race against another, it must be called out.

Source: AFA iVoterGuide on 2020 Alabama Senate race Nov 3, 2020

Tommy Tuberville: Opposes laws against discrimination over sexual orientation

Q: Should LGBTQ people be protected against discrimination based on sexual orientation?

Tommy Tuberville: No. Opposes laws protecting people against discrimination because of sexual orientation.

Doug Jones: Yes. Credits his gay son with helping him to change his views. Co-sponsored anti-discrimination Equality Act.

Source: CampusElect on 2020 Alabama Senate race Oct 10, 2020

John Merrill: Implemented America's toughest voter ID law

While serving as Alabama's 53rd Secretary of State John has continued to bring conservative-minded reforms to government.

Made it easier to vote and harder to cheat by implementing America's toughest voter ID law, all while cleaning the state's voter rolls and registering record numbers of citizens.

Slashed his office budget and saved Alabama taxpayers millions by reducing overhead, ending duplication of services, and making government operate at the speed of business.

Source: 2020 Alabama Senate website JohnMerrill.com Feb 5, 2020

John Merrill: Being gay is a "decision," but would not take away rights

Merrill said, "A gay person can be gay, a straight person can be straight, that's a decision for each individual to make." Asked if there is a message he would deliver to gay Republicans in Alabama who might be offended by his remarks about "homosexual activities," Merrill said he would never be supportive of an effort to take away gay Alabamans' right to be openly gay.
Source: NBC News on 2020 Alabama Senate race Jul 17, 2019

John Merrill: America too interested in homosexual activities on TV

Merrill said that America is losing its moral core due to its preoccupation with "homosexual activities" and TV shows that focus on "how people are trying to date on TV." "There are no more good TV shows on like 'Gunsmoke,' 'Bonanza,' 'Andy Griffith,' 'I Love Lucy,'" Merrill said. "We don't have those shows anymore. We're too interested in homosexual activities." He said that America is obsessed with TV shows that lack biblical foundations and fail to promote a nuclear family.
Source: USA Today on 2020 Alabama Senate race Jul 16, 2019

John Merrill: We're too interested in homosexual activities in pop culture

Merrill fielded a question about the shift in the culture and noted that some of that shift could be attributed to the changes in pop culture, including what was being shown on television. "That's what we've allowed to happen," Merrill said. "How have we allowed it to happen? There are no more good TV shows on like 'Gunsmoke,' 'Bonanza,' 'The Virginian,' 'Andy Griffith,' 'I Love Lucy.' We don't have those shows anymore. We're too interested in homosexual activities. We're too interested in seeing how this family's finding a way to mess on this family or to see how people are trying to date on TV, or having wife-swapping on TV. That's what we watch. When we push back against that, and we quit allowing it to be in our homes--that's how those changes have occurred because we've allowed them to slowly but surely come into our lives."
Source: YellowHammerNews.com on 2020 Alabama Senate race Jul 12, 2019

Doug Jones: Protecting voting rights shouldn't be partisan issue

Jones is calling for an overhaul of U.S. voting laws and campaign finance laws. The measure includes same-day voter registration, new paper ballot standards for states, money for election systems and would target voter suppression tactics. Jones said it's not a partisan issue. "Voting is not just a right and a privilege, it is one of those things that everybody has a duty to do," he said. "And if they've got a duty we need to make that easier for people to exercise that duty."
Source: WHNT-19 News on 2020 Alabama Senate race Mar 11, 2019

Doug Jones: Co-sponsored civil rights protections for LGBTQ people

Jones is a political outlier, a Deep South advocate in the Senate for gay and lesbian people. On the federal level, Jones has followed through on his support during the campaign for gay and transgender rights. He became the 46th Senate co-sponsor of a bill to codify protections for gay and transgender people into civil rights laws, including the 1964 Civil Rights Act.
Source: RollCall.com on 2020 Alabama Senate race Apr 13, 2018

Kay Ivey: Held first ever Governor's Disability Job Fair

One of the most meaningful experiences I have had as governor was to participate in the first ever Governor's Disability Job Fair with the Secretary of Labor, Commissioner of Mental Health, Executive Director of the Governor's Office on Disability, and Commissioner of the Department of Rehabilitation Services. The fair consisted of more than 95 employers looking to fill over 3,100 positions. 1,100 people attended the Disability Job Fair.

One of those job-seekers is with us tonight--Caryn McDade. Caryn walked into the Governor's Disability Job Fair looking for an opportunity. As a teenager, Caryn's learning disabilities plagued her until she saw no alternative other than dropping out of school. [Caryn has been working with several agencies to get her GED and develop other job skills.] By the end of the week after the fair, Caryn was employed full-time as a home health care aide.

Source: 2018 State of the State speech to Alabama legislature Jan 9, 2018

Doug Jones: Endorsed of Human Rights Campaign

Jones has the endorsement of Human Rights Campaign for his views on LGBT issues. He's also voiced support for protecting the rights of transgender people in the military and in public schools.
Source: NBC News on 2020 Alabama Senate race Dec 12, 2017

Roy Moore: 14th Amendment restricts states & causes many problems

In Moore's June appearance, one of the hosts says he would like to see an amendment that would void all the amendments after the Tenth. "That would eliminate many problems," Moore replied.

The host agreed with Moore, before turning his attention specifically to the 14th Amendment, which was passed during the Reconstruction period following the Civil War and guaranteed citizenship to former slaves.

Moore replied, "the 14th Amendment has been a restriction on the states using the first Ten Amendments by and through the 14th Amendment. To restrict the states from doing something that the federal government was restricted from doing and allowing the federal government to do something which the first Ten Amendments prevented them from doing. If you understand the incorporation doctrine used by the courts and what it meant. You'd understand what I'm talking about."

Source: CNN on 2017 Alabama Senate race Dec 11, 2017

Doug Jones: 2000: Got convictions of two involved in 1963 church bombing

In 2000, he was given the chance to work on the case that first inspired him to become a prosecutor. Jones worked to successfully convict Thomas Edwin Blanton Jr. and Bobby Frank Cherry, two members of the KKK, for their role in the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in 1963. Chris Hamlin, a pastor at the church, remembers his first meeting with Jones. "He was very persistent and passionate about pursuing the case," he said. "He understood what was at stake in the African-American community."
Source: Newsweek magazine on 2017 Alabama special Senate race Dec 10, 2017

Doug Jones: Full equality for women in the workplace

Today's champion of equal pay is Lilly Ledbetter and her battle for equality in Gadsden, Alabama. In the Senate, I will work to extend the spirit of the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act to make if mandatory that two people, doing the same job with the same qualifications are paid equally--regardless of their gender. The shenanigans around the 2016 campaign must be pushed aside and full equality for women made the law and the norm in America.
Source: 2017-2018 Alabama Senate website DougJonesForSenate.com Aug 17, 2017

Mo Brooks: Defend blaming "many sides" for white supremacist violence

President Donald Trump's initial reluctance to denounce the white supremacist groups responsible for the deadly hate-fueled violence in Charlottesville over the weekend prompted swift backlash from Republicans in Congress.

But all three main candidates for the Alabama Senate seat, like Trump, issued lukewarm condemnations of the white supremacist violence in Charlottesville; and all have pledged to shepherd the president's agenda virtually unequivocally.

While others were urging the president to take a more definitive stand against hate groups [after Trump said "many sides" were to blame], Moore, Brooks, and Strange echoed the president's broad condemnation of "violence," "hatred," and "bigotry." Both Brooks and Strange said explicitly that they stood behind Trump's comments--which is more than Trump himself did. By Monday [after the weekend comments], the president had offered updated remarks that explicitly mentioned white supremacist hate groups.

Source: TheDailyBeast.com coverage of 2017 Alabama Senate race Aug 15, 2017

Roy Moore: OpEd: Lukewarm condemnation of white supremacist violence

President Donald Trump's initial reluctance to denounce the white supremacist groups responsible for the deadly hate-fueled violence in Charlottesville over the weekend prompted swift backlash from Republicans in Congress.

But all three main candidates for the Alabama Senate seat, like Trump, issued lukewarm condemnations of the white supremacist violence in Charlottesville; and all have pledged to shepherd the president's agenda virtually unequivocally.

While others were urging the president to take a more definitive stand against hate groups [after Trump said "many sides" were to blame], Moore, Brooks, and Strange echoed the president's broad condemnation of "violence," "hatred," and "bigotry." Both Brooks and Strange said explicitly that they stood behind Trump's comments--which is more than Trump himself did. By Monday [after the weekend comments], the president had offered updated remarks that explicitly mentioned white supremacist hate groups.

Source: TheDailyBeast.com coverage of 2017 Alabama Senate race Aug 15, 2017

Roy Moore: Defend blaming "many sides" for white supremacist violence

President Donald Trump's initial reluctance to denounce the white supremacist groups responsible for the deadly hate-fueled violence in Charlottesville over the weekend prompted swift backlash from Republicans in Congress.

But all three main candidates for the Alabama Senate seat, like Trump, issued lukewarm condemnations of the white supremacist violence in Charlottesville; and all have pledged to shepherd the president's agenda virtually unequivocally.

While others were urging the president to take a more definitive stand against hate groups [after Trump said "many sides" were to blame], Moore, Brooks, and Strange echoed the president's broad condemnation of "violence," "hatred," and "bigotry." Both Brooks and Strange said explicitly that they stood behind Trump's comments--which is more than Trump himself did. By Monday [after the weekend comments], the president had offered updated remarks that explicitly mentioned white supremacist hate groups.

Source: TheDailyBeast.com coverage of 2017 Alabama Senate race Aug 15, 2017

Roy Moore: Our sacred institution of marriage is one man and one woman

The state Court of the Judiciary suspended Moore from his judicial position for the remainder of his term, after finding that Moore violated judicial ethics by telling probate judges in a January 2016 administrative order that they still had a duty to uphold Alabama's laws against gay marriage. Moore said then, "I have done my duty under the laws of this state to stand for the undeniable truth that God ordained marriage as the union of one man and one woman."

Moore revisited the gay marriage issue during his remarks today. He said judges and justices are ignoring the Constitution. "The foundations of the fabric of our country are being shaken tremendously," Moore said. "Our sacred institution of marriage has been destroyed by the Supreme Court. Our rights and liberties are in jeopardy."

Moore defended the actions that led to his suspension. "What I did, I did for the people of Alabama," Moore said. "I stood up for the Constitution. I stood up for God."

Source: Birmingham News on 2017 Alabama Senate special election Apr 26, 2017

Chris Countryman: No discrimination based on orientation or gender identity

Countryman is in favor of:
Source: 2018 Alabama Gubernatorial campaign website "testtrac2018" Mar 15, 2017

Chris Countryman: Ok to refuse church services to gay couples

[On gender identity rights], Christopher A. Countryman is in favor of:
Source: 2018 Alabama Gubernatorial campaign website "testtrac2018" Mar 15, 2017

John Merrill: Just because you're 18 doesn't give you the right to vote

Automatic voter registration has recently emerged a key tool in increasing the United States' anemic voter turnout. Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill, a Republican, has joined the opposition. Asked a question about automatic voter registration, Merrill declared that the practice "cheapen[s] the work" of civil rights heroes and that "just because you turned 18 doesn't give you the right" to vote.
Source: Slate.com on 2020 Alabama Senate race Nov 2, 2016

Walt Maddox: Honors Civil Rights History Task Force

Mayor Maddox and the Tuscaloosa City Council formally recognized the efforts of the Tuscaloosa Civil Rights History Task Force. "The Tuscaloosa Civil Rights History Task Force seeks to bring about positive change and reconciliation through collecting, preserving and telling the stories of the important struggle for civil rights in Tuscaloosa," Maddox said in reading the proclamation. "Its vision for Tuscaloosa is for it to become an important tourist destination for civil rights history.
Source: Tuscaloosa News on 2018 Alabama Gubernatorial race Oct 19, 2016

Ron Crumpton: Give the disabled the ability to obtain service dogs

The Daily endorses Ron Crumpton, of Pelham in Tuesday's Democratic primary. While he has never held an elected office, he has at least dabbled in state legislative issues. He has proposed bills that would increase access to medical marijuana, and that would give the disabled the ability to obtain service dogs. He has seven years' experience lobbying the state Legislature on behalf of various nonprofits.
Source: Decatur Daily on 2016 Alabama Senate race Feb 26, 2016

Marcus Bowman: Marriage defined as one man and one woman

Q: Do you support or oppose the policy, "Comfortable with same-sex marriage"

A: Strongly oppose. Marriage should be defined as between one man and one woman. Following the 10th Amendment can be a way that states can have their own approach on this issue.

Source: Email interview on 2016 Alabama Senate race with OnTheIssues Jan 21, 2016

Ron Crumpton: Legally require hiring more women & minorities

Q: Do you agree or disagree with the statement, "Legally require hiring more women/minorities"?

A: Strongly agree. Women make $0.78 vs. men; minorities make $0.75 vs. whites

Source: Email interview on 2016 Alabama Senate race with OnTheIssues Nov 26, 2015

Ron Crumpton: Add gender identity to Civil Rights Act

Q: Do you agree or disagree with the statement, "Comfortable with same-sex marriage"?

A: Strongly agree. I would offer an amendment to the Civil Rights Act that would add sexual orientation and gender identity to the list of protected classes.

Source: Email interview on 2016 Alabama Senate race with OnTheIssues Nov 26, 2015

Mo Brooks: 2014: Democrats wage war on whites

Brooks landed in an even bigger controversy in August 2014. As by conservative radio host Laura Ingraham about a statement that the Republican party was alienating non-white voters, Brooks responded: "This is a part of the war on whites that's being launched by the Democratic Party. And the way in which they're launching this war is by claiming that whites hate everybody else. It's a part of the strategy that Barack Obama implemented in 2008, continued in 2012, where he divides us all on race, on sex, greed, envy, class warfare, and all those kinds of things." Ingraham responded that the characterization was "a little out there," and numerous Democrats blasted Brooks for playing the race card. But he was unapologetic. On a regular basis, Brooks said a few days later, Democrats "appeal to specific racial groups by saying we will protect you, that particular racial group -well, who are they talking about protecting them from? Well, they're talking about protecting them from Republicans."
Source: Almanac of American Politics on 2022 Alabama Senate race Oct 5, 2015

Chris Countryman: Repeatedly sought same-sex marriage license

Chris Countryman, who repeatedly sought a marriage license in Houston County earlier this year along with his same-sex partner, has announced plans to seek the Democratic nomination for governor. Countryman and partner Bruce Munger Countryman eventually received a marriage license in Coffee County before Houston County announced it would begin issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples. Countryman and Munger were together for more than three years before initially seeking a marriage license.
Source: Dothan Eagle on 2018 Alabama gubernatorial race Sep 21, 2015

Ron Crumpton: Apply 1960s civil rights laws to LGBT community

The simple fact is if you are a black, Hispanic, Jewish, Muslim, Buddhist, Catholic, Protestant, Mormon atheist, gay, female, have one of the aforementioned groups in your family then you have been affected by discrimination. The current 'fad' in discrimination is state laws that would allow businesses to legally discriminate against members of the LGBT community. The problem with that is that we already have case law that should be applied to this issue.

From the reconstruction era until the 1960's, the States passed many laws aimed at denying access to goods and services to members of the black community, but in 1964 Congress and the US Supreme Court put an end to those laws. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. I would offer an amendment to the Civil Rights Act that would simply add sexual orientation & gender identity to the list of protected classes.

Source: 2016 Alabama Senate campaign website, CrumptonForAlabama.com Aug 7, 2015

Ron Crumpton: Women make $0.78 vs. men; minorities make $0.75 vs. whites

One of the cornerstones of the American experiment is that all men are created equal, subsequent amendments and court rulings clarifies that all men and women are equal in the eyes of the law regardless of race, creed, or color, but reality does not always resemble the law.

The 14th Amendment guarantees the equal protection for all American citizens, and the Civil Rights Act of 1964 specifically forbids discrimination based on sex or race in the work place, yet women only make 78 cents on the dollar compared to men and minorities only make 75 cents on the dollar as compared to white males.

This discrimination comes at a cost of $550 billion a year in lost wages for women, and when you factor in minorities, you are looking at a loss of $1 trillion. I believe that a realistic goal would be to get the pay of women and minorities up to 90 cents on the dollar. This would mean an injection of over $600 billion in new wages each year, and more than $150 billion in new tax revenues.

Source: 2016 Senate campaign website CrumptonForAlabama.com Jul 23, 2015

Bradley Byrne: States should be free to decide on gay marriage

States should be free to set their own marriage policies even if it means some choose to sanction gay unions, Byrne said. "I don't think the federal government should be involved in family issues--period," he said. Byrne said neither the federal government nor the courts should force same-sex unions on states like Alabama that hold true to traditional marriage. "That's why we have a federal system," he said.
Source: Birmingham News on 2020 Alabama Senate race Feb 18, 2014

Doug Jones: Gay son celebrates Jones' swearing in as senator

Jones took the oath of office from Vice President Pence. Looking on were Jones' wife, Louise, his son Christopher and his son, Carson, a-22-year-old zookeeper who confirmed he was gay.

Carson was "thrilled" with his dad's victory. "We have been overwhelmed by the support of so many people that made this happen. Alabama made a really big statement that unity wins out. I couldn't be prouder of him or my home state," he said.

Source: Birmingham News on 2020 Alabama Senate race Feb 18, 2014

Bradley Byrne: Marriage is defined as one man and one woman

Marriage is defined as one man and one woman. If more people in America understood that, a lot of problems we're facing, I don't think we would be facing them. Marriage should be between one man and one woman. We have established in our state constitution that marriage is between one man and one woman.
Source: Birmingham News on 2020 Alabama Senate debate Oct 21, 2013

Bradley Byrne: Supreme Court should not define marriage for states

Byrne said in a statement that he didn't believe the Supreme Court was the proper forum for deciding whether same-sex marriage should be legal. "I have always believed that marriage should be defined as the union between one man and one woman," he said. "I believe today's decision [legalizing same-sex marriage] threatens what should be exclusive state jurisdiction over matters pertaining to marriage."
Source: Birmingham News on 2020 Alabama Senate debate Oct 21, 2013

Robert Bentley: Ever mindful of our turbulent past 50 years ago

Fifty years ago, Alabama stood poised on center stage as a series of historical events unfolded around us. Many in this room would bear witness to events that changed history.

By year's end, Alabama would see many peaceful protestors jailed for daring to advocate equal treatment for all people. The University of Alabama would enroll its first African-American students. Four little girls killed inside their place of worship during Sunday School. The rising up of thousands who marched to this building knowing they were endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights. That was 50 years ago.

Today, we are ever-mindful of our turbulent past while we eagerly look forward to a new chapter in our state's history. Alabama IS our Sweet Home. And we want it to be a place where economic opportunity abounds and there are good-paying jobs, where children can get a good education, where counties and cities can build roads to compete for businesses and industries.

Source: 2013 State of the State address to Alabama Legislature Feb 5, 2013

Kay Ivey: One-man-one-woman marriage is cornerstone of civilization

I firmly believe marriage is between one man and one woman. It is a sacred, legal union that has been the cornerstone of civilization for centuries. It is wrong to legalize other "forms" of marriage, such as same-sex unions, and equally wrong to grant them the same legal rights.

My opposition to same-sex marriage is based on more than my personal Christian beliefs. Incidentally, none of the world's other four largest religions--Judaism, Buddhism, Hinduism, or Islam--recognizes same-sex marriage as legitimate either.

There is no advantage to bringing up children in homes where parents are both of the same gender. Years of research show children need both a mom and a dad to reach their maximum potential. And other studies show children brought up in same-sex households have lower self-esteem.

I will always oppose the legalization of same-sex marriage in Alabama and elsewhere in the nation, and I support legislation that defines marriage as being between one man and one woman.

Source: 2010 Alabama Gubernatorial campaign website KayIvey.org Mar 31, 2010

Robert Bentley: Voted NO on adding sexual orientation to hate crime criteria

Rep. Bentley voted NAY on bill HB829:Excerpts from Legislative Synopsis: