State of Arizona Archives: on Government Reform


Mark Kelly: Refuses corporate PAC money, taken lobbyist money

Q: Require more disclosure of political donations?

Mark Kelly: Unclear. Refuses corporate PAC money because its influence has "poisoned our democracy." Has taken lobbyist money.

Martha McSally: No. In 2016 voted against making it easier to see who was funding TV ads. In 2020 called for help from "conservative outside groups."

Source: CampusElect on 2020 Arizona Senate race Oct 10, 2020

Martha McSally: Voted against showing funding of campaign ads

Q: Require more disclosure of political donations?

Martha McSally: No. In 2016 voted against making it easier to see who was funding TV ads. In 2020 called for help from "conservative outside groups."

Mark Kelly: Unclear. Refuses corporate PAC money because its influence has "poisoned our democracy." Has taken lobbyist money.

Source: CampusElect on 2020 Arizona Senate race Oct 10, 2020

Mark Kelly: Declined to take a position on eliminating the filibuster

Kelly declined to take a position on eliminating the filibuster, a requirement for most major legislation to get 60 votes in the Senate, which many Democrats see as a major impediment to their ability to enact their agenda. He said only that he'll give it "careful consideration" if it comes up. "Washington is broken, and this highlights how broken it is that we're having these fights over old Senate rules," Kelly said.
Source: Associated Press on 2020 Arizona Senate debate Oct 8, 2020

Doug Ducey: Eliminate three regulations for every new one

We've been on a blitz to wipe out needless regulations. 2,289. Gone. That's the equivalent of a $134 million tax cut without impacting the general fund one penny. But we're not done yet. I've issued a new Executive Order, with a new reform: If the government ever deems a new regulation absolutely necessary, it must first identify three others to eliminate. The result: New regulations will naturally mean less regulations.
Source: 2020 Arizona State of the State address Jan 13, 2020

Doug Ducey: For every new law, repeal three old ones

We're not short on laws here in our state. Over 107 years we've built up a hearty 11,000 plus pages. Certainly, many of our laws have merit. But many don't.

So why does each legislative session seem to be a competition to pass the most new laws? What if we found a way to get rid of old unneeded laws, rather than just creating new ones? If for every law we passed, we repealed three or if new laws had sunsets. I'm challenging this legislature let's chop the stacks and stacks of statutes down.

Source: 2019 State of the State address to the Arizona legislature Jan 14, 2019

Doug Ducey: No legislative immunity: laws apply to lawmakers

Let's start with eliminating the most unnecessary law of them all: legislative immunity. We are a nation of laws, not men. No one is above the law. Congress likes to exempt themselves from the law--but isn't that why Americans hold them in such contempt?

Let's show the people of Arizona that their elected leaders will live under the same laws as every man and woman in this state. Send T.J. Shope's referral to the ballot and let the people speak on special privileges for elected officials.

Source: 2019 State of the State address to the Arizona legislature Jan 14, 2019

David Garcia: Takes no money from lobbyists or corporate PACs

Q: Campaign Finance Reform: Should there be restrictions or disclosure requirements on large and anonymous political donations?

Doug Ducey (R): No. Prohibited AZ cities from requiring organizations sponsoring campaign ads to reveal major financial backers. Considers it a First Amendment issue.

David Garcia (D): Criticizes money in politics but specific position unclear. Has pledged not to take money from lobbyists or corporate PACs & returned $7,000 to donors identified as lobbyists.

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Arizona Governor race Oct 9, 2018

David Garcia: Supports automatic voter registration

Q: Voting Rights: Support voting rules that prioritize preventing the possibility of fraud, even if they limit access?

Doug Ducey (R): Yes. Signed a bill making it a felony to turn in another voter's ballot--even with the person's permission.

David Garcia (D): No. Supports Automatic Voter Registration to ensure all eligible Arizonans can cast their vote.Q:

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Arizona Governor race Oct 9, 2018

Doug Ducey: Don't reveal donors of campaign ads; that's First Amendment

Q: Campaign Finance Reform: Should there be restrictions or disclosure requirements on large and anonymous political donations?

Doug Ducey (R): No. Prohibited AZ cities from requiring organizations sponsoring campaign ads to reveal major financial backers. Considers it a First Amendment issue.

David Garcia (D): Criticizes money in politics but specific position unclear. Has pledged not to take money from lobbyists or corporate PACS & returned $7,000 to donors identified as lobbyists.

Source: CampusElect 2018: Arizona legislative voting records Oct 9, 2018

Doug Ducey: Felony to turn in another voter's ballot

Q: Voting Rights: Support voting rules that prioritize preventing the possibility of fraud, even if they limit access?

Doug Ducey (R): Yes. Signed a bill making it a felony to turn in another voter's ballot--even with the person's permission.

David Garcia (D): No. Supports Automatic Voter Registration to ensure all eligible Arizonans can cast their vote.Q:

Source: CampusElect 2018: Arizona legislative voting records Oct 9, 2018

Kyrsten Sinema: Overturn Citizens United; more political donation disclosure

Q: Support DISCLOSE Act to require political ads to disclose their largest funders? Stand on Supreme Court Citizens United decision, allowing unlimited political donations from corporations & unions?

Martha McSally (R): Voted against making it easier to see who was funding TV ads.

Kyrsten Sinema (D): Co-sponsored DISCLOSE ACT. "Overturn Citizens United." Only way to fix "our broken political system is to get the vast sums of secret money out of politics & shine a light with more transparency."

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Arizona Senate race Oct 9, 2018

David Garcia: Right to vote--and to have your vote counted--is sacred

Democracy means every Arizonan having a voice, and being heard when the most important decisions facing out state are made. Voting is the foundation of our democracy. The right to vote--and to have your vote counted--is sacred.

In 2016, we saw long lines that made national headlines, our voter database targeted by foreign actors, and consistent miscommunication or outright incorrect information sent to voters.

Voter registration systems in Arizona are outdated and error-prone, blocking thousands of eligible Arizonans from casting a ballot. Too many Arizonans attempt to vote but find themselves left off the rolls, deleted or purged. Automatic Voter Registration will modernize our voter registration system, bringing us into the 21st Century and ensuring that all eligible Arizonans can cast their vote. In particular, automatic voter registration would save taxpayer money, increase electoral accuracy & voter participation while making sure our elections are safer and more secure against attacks.

Source: 2018 Arizona Gubernatorial campaign website dg4az.com Mar 21, 2018

Deedra Abboud: Make voter registration easier

Q: Do you support or oppose the statement, "Make voter registration easier"?

A: Support

Source: OnTheIssues interview of 2018 Arizona Senate candidate Mar 5, 2018

Doug Marks: Make voter registration easier

Q: Do you support or oppose the statement, "Make voter registration easier"?

A: Yes

Source: OnTheIssues interview of 2018 Arizona Senate candidate Mar 5, 2018

Kelli Ward: Less government meddling

Personal responsibility, government meddling less in our day-to-day lives, and lower taxes are key ingredients to stimulate economic growth and job creation. So often we hear statistics and generalities, but one's job is a deeply personal issue and a major aspect of their life. We need to focus on the dignity and independence that good jobs provide and adjust our policies accordingly.
Source: 2018 Arizona Senatorial website KelliWard.com Oct 1, 2017

Andy Biggs: Create 12th Federal Circuit to reflect Arizona's values

If elected to represent you in Congress, I pledge to introduce these six bills in my first two weeks on the job.
  1. No pay for all Members of Congress until a balanced budget is passed.
  2. Rein in the bureaucratic rule-making process from the executive branch and restore it to Congress.
  3. End the ObamaCare loophole designed to benefit Members of Congress.
  4. Pass Grant's Law to protect innocent U.S. citizens from violent illegal immigrants.
  5. Repeal Common Core and return all control of our education policies to the states and locals.
  6. Remove Arizona from the 9th Federal Circuit Court and into a newly established 12th Federal Circuit.
California exerts disproportionate influence over Arizonans in the Ninth Circuit, with half of the Circuit's population being Californian. By establishing a new 12th Federal Circuit, we greatly reduce the burden on the 9th Federal Circuit and ensure that Arizona's values are more accurately reflected, advanced and defended by the rule of law.
Source: 2016 Arizona House campaign website BiggsForCongress.com Nov 8, 2016

Tom O`Halleran: Limit the influence of campaign donations & lobbyists

Reform campaign finance: There is just too much money involved in the election process. The voice of the middle class and those in poverty is being pushed aside by the influence of a few who hide behind current campaign finance laws. We need to find ways to limit the impact of the Supreme Court's Citizens United ruling. Registered lobbyists should not be allowed to be part of campaign organizations and finance committees.

Extend the lobbying ban: The two-year ban on legislators returning to the Capitol as lobbyists is the right idea, but it isn't enough. I support extending the ban to five years, and including staff in the ban.

Ban luxury trips: Luxury trips paid for by special interests happen under the guise of keeping members of Congress informed. Their real purpose is to give lobbyists special access and to reward legislators for voting a certain way. Those free trips for legislators should be banned.

Source: 2016 Arizona House campaign website TomOHalleran.com Nov 8, 2016

Ann Kirkpatrick: Joined lawsuit challenging AZ voting restrictions

Q: On Voting Rights: Support stricter voting rules such as voter ID requirements or reduced registration times, even if they prevent some people from voting?

Kirkpatrick: No. Joined lawsuit challenging AZ voting laws [which reduced the number of polling places in Maricopa County from 403 in 2008, to 211 in 2012, to 60 in 2016].

McCain: Position unclear. No visible stand found for or against increased requirements.

Source: CampusElect Voter Guide to 2016 Arizona Senate race Oct 9, 2016

Ann Kirkpatrick: Overturn Citizens United with constitutional amendment

Q: Do you support the Supreme Court's Citizens United decision, which allows unlimited independent political expenditures by corporations and unions?

Kirkpatrick: No. Supports Constitutional amendment to overturn.

McCain: No. "Worst decision ever." But voted against Constitutional amendment to overturn.

Q: Do you support the DISCLOSE Act, which requires key funders of political ads to put their names on those ads?

Kirkpatrick: Yes

McCain: No. Says objection is about how Act is written.

Source: CampusElect Voter Guide to 2016 Arizona Senate race Oct 9, 2016

John McCain: Citizens United was worst decision ever, but don't overturn

Q: Do you support the Supreme Court's Citizens United decision, which allows unlimited independent political expenditures by corporations and unions?

Kirkpatrick: No. Supports Constitutional amendment to overturn.

McCain: No. "Worst decision ever." But voted against Constitutional amendment to overturn.

Q: Do you support the DISCLOSE Act, which requires key funders of political ads to put their names on those ads?

Kirkpatrick: Yes

McCain: No. Says objection is about how Act is written.

Source: CampusElect Voter Guide to 2016 Arizona Senate race Oct 9, 2016

Andy Biggs: No severance pay for elected officials caught in misconduct

Biggs introduced HB 2115: AN ACT adding "misconduct" to the "conflict of interest" statue, and defining "misappropriation of public monies; penalty; employment contract":
Source: Arizona legislative voting records: HB 2115 Jan 19, 2016

Doug Ducey: Repeal laws to stimulate economic growth

All too often a government's success is measured by how many bills are passed. We all have priorities this year. But as you debate new laws, I call on you to ask: Is this the proper role of government? Are we expanding freedom--or limiting it? In that spirit, in the governor's office, we've identified hundreds of buried regulations that state agencies have imposed on Arizonans through the backdoor, hurting businesses large and small. Stifling job creation and progress.
Source: 2016 State of the State speech to Arizona legislature Jan 11, 2016

Doug Ducey: State government hiring freeze

To balance the books, we're going to institute a state government hiring freeze--with protections for vital areas, like public safety and child safety. However, when it comes to bureaucracy, we're cutting back. The government can't take on any new expenses when we can't afford the ones we already have.

Our budget does what budgets are supposed to do. It prioritizes vital commitments that Arizonans value the most--public safety, justice, classrooms, and aid to the needy and vulnerable.

Source: State of the State address to 2015 Arizona Legislature Jan 12, 2015

Fred DuVal: Ban on legislator gifts from lobbyists or companies

DuVal's plan calls for every elected official in the state and the lobbyists that attempt to influence them to abide by tough, new standards including:"Ethics reform is not a partisan issue," said DuVal. "Everyone in Arizona will benefit from cleaning up this system."
Source: 2014 Arizona gubernatorial campaign website, Fred2014.com Jul 2, 2014

Fred DuVal: Toll-free phone number to report unnecessary regulations

Fred will call on his cabinet and stakeholders to join in a government-wide initiative to reduce the volume of Arizona's regulations. In fact, his first year in office will include a full-time leader for this effort, and a toll- free phone number that businesses can call to report and find help dealing with unnecessary regulations. A streamlined regulatory process is a central priority in making Arizona competitive.
Source: 2014 Arizona gubernatorial campaign website, Fred2014.com Jul 2, 2014

Jan Brewer: Curb citizen initiatives to reduce fraud

HB2305: Political committees [must] submit to the Secretary of State a list of all petition circulators & a copy of a criminal records check performed on each circulator.

Analysis by The Arizona Republic (Apr. 16, 2017): Four years ago, Arizona lawmakers passed an ambitious plan to curb citizen initiatives and make other substantial changes to elections. They said new rules were needed to reduce voter fraud and streamline elections. That didn't sell with a coalition of citizen groups. They called the bill voter suppression, and set out to block it. They got the bill referred to the 2014 ballot; coalition members were confident voters would kill it. So were lawmakers; they repealed the measure [but re-passed it in parts].

Legislative Outcome:Passed House 33-26-1 on Jun/13/13; Passed Senate 16-13-1 on Jun/13/13; Signed by Governor Jan Brewer on Jun/19/13

Source: The Arizona Republic on Arizona voting record HB2305 Jun 19, 2013

Andy Biggs: Curb citizen initiatives to reduce fraud

HB2305: Political committees [must] submit to the Secretary of State a list of all petition circulators & a copy of a criminal records check performed on each circulator.

Analysis by The Arizona Republic (Apr. 16, 2017): Four years ago, Arizona lawmakers passed an ambitious plan to curb citizen initiatives and make other substantial changes to elections. They said new rules were needed to reduce voter fraud and streamline elections. That didn't sell with a coalition of citizen groups. They called the bill voter suppression, and set out to block it. They got the bill referred to the 2014 ballot; coalition members were confident voters would kill it. So were lawmakers; they repealed the measure [but re-passed it in parts].

Legislative Outcome:Passed House 33-26-1 on Jun/13/13; Passed Senate 16-13-1 on Jun/13/13; State Sen. Andy Biggs voted YES; Signed by Governor Jan Brewer on Jun/19/13

Source: The Arizona Republic on Arizona voting record HB2305 Jun 13, 2013

Debbie Lesko: Curb citizen initiatives to reduce fraud

HB2305: Political committees [must] submit to the Secretary of State a list of all petition circulators & a copy of a criminal records check performed on each circulator.

Analysis by The Arizona Republic (Apr. 16, 2017): Four years ago, Arizona lawmakers passed an ambitious plan to curb citizen initiatives and make other substantial changes to elections. They said new rules were needed to reduce voter fraud and streamline elections. That didn't sell with a coalition of citizen groups. They called the bill voter suppression, and set out to block it. They got the bill referred to the 2014 ballot; coalition members were confident voters would kill it. So were lawmakers; they repealed the measure [but re-passed it in parts].

Legislative Outcome:Passed House 33-26-1 on Jun/13/13; State Rep. Debbie Lesko voted YES; Passed Senate 16-13-1 on Jun/13/13; Signed by Governor Jan Brewer on Jun/19/13

Source: The Arizona Republic on Arizona voting record HB2305 Jun 13, 2013

Kelli Ward: Curb citizen initiatives to reduce fraud

HB2305: Political committees [must] submit to the Secretary of State a list of all petition circulators & a copy of a criminal records check performed on each circulator.

Analysis by The Arizona Republic (Apr. 16, 2017): Four years ago, Arizona lawmakers passed an ambitious plan to curb citizen initiatives and make other substantial changes to elections. They said new rules were needed to reduce voter fraud and streamline elections. That didn't sell with a coalition of citizen groups. They called the bill voter suppression, and set out to block it. They got the bill referred to the 2014 ballot; coalition members were confident voters would kill it. So were lawmakers; they repealed the measure [but re-passed it in parts].

Legislative Outcome:Passed House 33-26-1 on Jun/13/13; Passed Senate 16-13-1 on Jun/13/13; State Sen. Kelli Ward voted YES; Signed by Governor Jan Brewer on Jun/19/13

Source: The Arizona Republic on Arizona voting record HB2305 Jun 13, 2013

Steve Farley: Curbing citizen initiatives is voter suppression

HB2305: Political committees [must] submit to the Secretary of State a list of all petition circulators & a copy of a criminal records check performed on each circulator.

Analysis by The Arizona Republic (Apr. 16, 2017): Four years ago, Arizona lawmakers passed an ambitious plan to curb citizen initiatives and make other substantial changes to elections. They said new rules were needed to reduce voter fraud and streamline elections. That didn't sell with a coalition of citizen groups. They called the bill voter suppression, and set out to block it. They got the bill referred to the 2014 ballot; coalition members were confident voters would kill it. So were lawmakers; they repealed the measure [but re-passed it in parts].

Legislative Outcome:Passed House 33-26-1 on Jun/13/13; State Rep. Steve Farley voted NO; Passed Senate 16-13-1 on Jun/13/13; Signed by Governor Jan Brewer on Jun/19/13

Source: The Arizona Republic on Arizona voting record HB2305 Jun 13, 2013

Richard Carmona: All earmarks are not pork

Flake attempted from the start of the race to tie Carmona to Obama particularly and Democratic policies in general. And it's a fight Flake continued at this debate, arguing that Carmona's positions, ranging from earmarks to healthcare, reflected the position of the Obama administration.

Carmona defended earmarks, arguing that "all earmarks are not pork," adding that "there are necessities that the federal government can provide"--pointing to investments in infrastructure as necessities that small businesses simply can't handle on their own. But Flake, who has been criticized for failing to bring federal funding to his district, said that Carmona's view was similar to Obama's.

"Here's this philosophy again, that all jobs have to be created by the federal government. That's why Dr. Carmona is comfortable in the Democratic Party, because that's the attitude of the Obama administration--that unless the federal government somehow creates it, it didn't exist," Flake said.

Source: The Hill coverage of 2012 Arizona Senate debates Oct 10, 2012

Jeff Flake: Opposes Open Government initiative for non-partisan primary

Q: The Open Government initiative that we could see on the November ballot, which would put all candidates on the same primary ballot, what do you think of it?

A: Not a big fan. They did it in California. They thought that it would result in a lot more competitive general elections there. It looks as if there will be only a few, if any, that will really turn out that way. I kind of like the nominating process we already have. It seems that when we go down this road--like we did with Clean Elections--hoping for something better, it always turns out worse.

Q: Proponents of the initiative hope it would address gridlock. How can we do that?

A: Right now, when you look at the gridlock we have, what's frustrating is that we passed a budget and some people may not like it, but it's a serious budget. And everyone knows that politics is the art of compromise. You have to compromise on some issues if you want to pass something.

Source: The Sahuarita Sun on 2012 Arizona Senate debates May 29, 2012

Richard Carmona: Supports Open Government initiative for non-partisan primary

Q: What do you think of the Open Government initiative that would put everybody on the same primary ballot?

A: I like it. The more transparency and nonpartisanship that we can bring to government I think is good.

Q: It's designed, in part, to address gridlock. Will it work?

A: I hope it works because the more we return democracy to really what it should be--that is candidates getting on their soapbox, speaking their values, convincing people they're the right person--and what's more important is the values you bring and the party you belong to, and I think this type of initiative helps to move it along... What we do know now is that partisan politics is paralyzing us.

Q: You've used the term "vicious" to describe Washington politics a couple of years ago. Is it any better today?

A: I would say that it's probably worse, and it's more polar. That's not what democracy should be. Democracy really should be a spirited exchange of ideas, make your case--it's the ultimate debate club.

Source: The Sahuarita Sun on 2012 Arizona Senate debates May 29, 2012

Richard Carmona: Require financial analysts to disclose contacts in Congress

I applaud the restrictions on insider trading by members of Congress put in place by the STOCK Act. However, important anti-corruption measures were left out, requiring financial analysts disclose contact with members of Congress & staff. It's the same requirements we have for lobbying, why shouldn't we have it for the financial industry?

It is past the time we put important restrictions in place to keep career politicians--or their favored special interest friends--from profiting from their offices.

Source: 2012 Senate campaign website, carmonaforarizona.com Mar 15, 2012

Mitt Romney: Earmark system is broken; ban them with line-item veto

SANTORUM [to Romney]: I suspect you would have supported earmarks if you were in the Senate.

ROMNEY: I would put a ban on earmarks. I think it opens the door to excessive spending on projects that don't need to be done. You voted to the "Bridge to Nowhere." I think these earmarks, we've had it with them. The 6,000 earmarks that were put in place under Speaker Gingrich's term, for instance, were oftentimes tagged on to other bills. We've had thousands of earmarks. They are typically bundled on to other bills.

SANTORUM: You're misrepresenting the facts. What happens in the earmark process was that members of Congress would publicly request these things, put them on paper, and have them allocated, and have them voted on.

ROMNEY: And the president can't veto it?

SANTORUM: He can veto the bill.

ROMNEY: But he can't veto the earmark?

SANTORUM: Well, we tried to do that. I supported a line-item veto.

ROMNEY: That's what I support.

Source: CNN's 2012 GOP Debate on eve of Arizona Primary Feb 22, 2012

Rick Santorum: Line-item veto needed; spending transparency until then

ROMNEY: I would put a ban on earmarks. It opens the door to excessive spending. We've had thousands of earmarks. They are typically bundled on to other bills.

SANTORUM: You're misrepresenting the facts. What happens in the earmark process was that members of Congress would publicly request these things, put them on paper, and have them allocated, and have them voted on.

ROMNEY: And the president can't veto it?

SANTORUM: He can veto the bill.

ROMNEY: But he can't veto the earmark?

SANTORUM: Well, we tried to do that. I supported a line-item veto.

ROMNEY: That's what I support.

SANTORUM: I agree with you. I support the line-item veto. I voted for a line-item veto so we could do just that. Unfortunately, the Supreme Court struck it down. I would like to go back, as president, again, and give the president the authority to line-item veto. But that's not the issue. The issue is, were they transparent? When I was in the Senate, there was transparency.

Source: CNN's 2012 GOP Debate on eve of Arizona Primary Feb 22, 2012

Rick Santorum: Endorsed Arlen Specter to assure conservative Supreme Court

ROMNEY [to Santorum]: The reason we have ObamaCare is because the pro-choice Senator in Pennsylvania that you supported and endorsed, Arlen Specter.

SANTORUM: I supported Arlen Specter because he was going to be the chairman of the Judiciary Committee when two to three Supreme Court nominees were going to be available. And maybe all three were going to be out of the conservative block. Arlen Specter asked me to support him; I said "will you support the president's nominees?" We had a 51/49 majority in the Senate. He said "I'll support the president's nominees as chairman." He saved Justice Thomas. Every nominee Arlen Specter supported, passed; Why? Because it gave Democrats cover to vote for it and it gave Republican moderates cover to vote for it. He gave the moderate Republicans and the conservative Democrats the leeway to then support that nominee. Arlen Specter defended Roberts, defended Alito. We have a 5/4 majority on the court, and I did the right thing for our country.

Source: CNN's 2012 GOP Debate on eve of Arizona Primary Feb 22, 2012

Ron Paul: If Congress doesn't earmark, the Executive Branch decides

SANTORUM: Congressman Paul is one of the most prolific earmarkers in the Congress today. I'm not criticizing; I'm just saying that's a fact.

PAUL: Earmarking is designating how the money's spent. If the Congress doesn't say the way the money should be spent, it goes to the executive branch, and that's the bad part. You don't want to give more power to the executive branch. Even if I'm president, I don't want more power over that funding. That should be with the people and with the Congress. But the reason we get into trouble with earmarking is the irresponsibility of Congress. Take your highway funds. We're supposed to pay a user fee; we should get our fair share back. But what do they do? They take the highway funds and they spend this money overseas. And then when the highways need building, then you have to go and fight the political system and maneuver and try to get some of your money back. If you say you're against earmarking, the answer is vote against the bill. That is what I do.

Source: CNN's 2012 GOP Debate on eve of Arizona Primary Feb 22, 2012

Joe Arpaio: Fined $153,978 for illegal in-kind campaign contributions

In July 2010, a committee established by Arpaio (the "Campaign to Re-Elect Joe Arpaio 2012") funded advertisements critical of Rick Romley, a candidate in the Republican primary for Maricopa County Attorney, and Arizona Attorney General candidate Tom Horne, despite the fact that Arpaio was not running for re-election at the time (his term did not expire until the end of 2012).

In August 2010, the Office of Maricopa County Attorney found that one of the advertisements, a direct mailer, advocated the defeat of Romley and was an in-kind contribution to Bill Montgomery (Romley's primary election opponent), in violation of Arizona election law. The order stated that a civil penalty in the amount of three times the amount of money spent on the mailer would be imposed on Campaign to Re-Elect Joe Arpaio.

In September 2010, Arpaio's campaign was fined $153,978. Montgomery ultimately defeated Romley in the primary election, with Romley stating Arpaio's ads "hurt" his results.

Source: Wikipedia on 2018 Arizona Senate race Sep 30, 2010

John McCain: Hayworth was unethical lobbyist hawking infomercials

McCain hammered Hayworth for his work as a registered lobbyist & infomercial pitchman after losing his re-election bid in 2006. Hayworth has stumbled since video surfaced of his appearance in a 2007 infomercial hawking free government money on behalf of Florida company accused of charging thousands of dollars for information that was readily available online or at a public library.

"These are the facts," McCain said. "J.D. Hayworth was a lobbyist. He was in late-night infomercials. He said he didn't d due diligence. My God man, didn't you know that this was a group that was taking people's money to say it could give them free government money."

Hayworth said, "It's really sad to see John McCain, who should be revered as a statesman, basically reduce to a political shape-shifter," he said, then turned to his opponent. "John, you've changed positions so much in this campaign maybe we'll have to set up an extra podium for you depending on which John McCain is going to answer which question."

Source: AP coverage of 2010 Arizona Senate Republican Primary Debate Jul 17, 2010

Janet Napolitano: We'll be remembered for what we did, not for how we budgeted

As I deliver the 2009 budget plan this week, I hearken back to a statement from my First Inaugural Address: "Generations to come will not remember us for how we balanced the budget, or how we expanded or contracted the size of government. Instead, they will remember how we educated our children, how we protected our seniors, how we built a new economy, and how we made this wonderful state an even better place to live."

Together, we have provided better educational opportunities for our children. We have protected our seniors and built toward a new economy. We have moved Arizona forward, and the budget I present to you will be balanced and will protect what we have achieved.

Source: Arizona 2009 State of the State Address Jan 12, 2009

Jan Brewer: Make it easier for our overseas military soldiers to vote

Brewer made it a priority to introduce and pass legislation which makes it easier for our overseas military soldiers and permanent residents to participate in our election process. This new law specifically assists those men and women serving our country abroad to vote and register to vote by internet or by fax. This most recent 2008 Election afforded hundreds of Arizona military and overseas citizens with the ability to cast ballots over the internet from over 60 countries throughout the world.
Source: Arizona Secretary of State website Dec 3, 2008

Jan Brewer: Replace punch card voting with touch-screen devices

Brewer took the lead on federal election reform by compiling the Help America Vote Act (HAVA) State Plan. Secretary Brewer's quick action placed Arizona second in the nation in accomplishing this federal mandate. Her new plan led to a successful strategy to get rid of punch card voting systems by 2004, create a centralized and uniform voter registration system which adds accuracy to the voter rolls, and have touch-screen voting devices for disabled voters in every precinct by the 2006 elections.
Source: Arizona Secretary of State website Dec 3, 2008

Kyrsten Sinema: Contribution & spending limits on political campaigns

Q: Do you support limiting individual contributions to state legislative candidates?

A: Yes.

Q: Limiting PAC contributions?

A: Yes.

Q: Corporate?

A: Yes.

Q: Political Parties?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support requiring full and timely disclosure of campaign finance information?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support imposing spending limits on state level political campaigns?

A: Yes.

Source: Arizona 2006 Congressional National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 2006

Jane Dee Hull: Pay state employees more, to ensure quality staff

Most of us agree that a small and efficient government works best. But we canít expect to keep the best and the brightest if we offer bottom-of-the-barrel compensation. State employees are now paid 13% less than the market average. This is unacceptable. We need a modern, efficient state government staffed by highly educated and properly compensated employees. I am recommending we take a major step toward closing the gap with a state employee package of $290 million, including pay and benefits.
Source: 2001 State of the State address to the Arizona legislature Jan 8, 2001

Gabby Giffords: Supports public funding for political campaigns

Q: Do you support limiting the following types of contributions to state legislative candidates? Individual?

A: No.

Q: PAC?

A: No.

Q: Corporate?

A: Yes.

Q: Political Parties?

A: No.

Q: Do you support requiring full disclosure of campaign finance information?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support imposing spending limits on state level political campaigns?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support partial funding from state taxes for state level political campaigns?

A: Yes.

Source: 2000 Arizona State National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 2000

Alan Keyes: Campaign reforms: unconstitutional ďincumbency protectionĒ

HATCH [to Keyes]: I have no question in my mind that we need to change the campaign finance system that we have. But I think that the McCain-Feingold bill is unconstitutional because it bars the parties and every public interest organization to use the same money to participate. And it seems to me itís just plain wrong. What do you think about it?

KEYES. All of these approaches are wrong because theyíre based on a premise that I think is unconstitutional. If we have the right of free association, then I think we have the right to associate our money with the causes we believe in, in any amount that we think is necessary to get those causes to work.

HATCH: Amen.

KEYES: For government to step in and for these politicians to be dictating what we can do under that rubric is a total violation of our Constitutional rights. And I think we ought to abandon it. It turns out to be incumbency protection anyway. They will never devise a system that isnít in their own interest.

Source: (cross-ref. from Hatch) Phoenix Arizona GOP Debate Dec 7, 1999

Alan Keyes: Unlimited contributions, but only by people, & publicized

Letís devise [campaign finance reform] thatís in the interest of our freedom. More freedom, not less. Simple premises that we should have: No dollar vote without a ballot vote. If you canít walk into the voting booth and cast a vote, you should not be able to make a contribution. No corporate contributions. No union contributions. No contributions whatsoever from any entities that are not actual breathing voters who can go cast a vote.

Rich folks who want to give a lot of money to candidates and causes they believe in, [should do so not from] behind PACs and camouflage, but under their own names, right out into the political arena. That will itself regulate participation of money in our politics. But at the end of the day, publicity tied with our informed voting is the best way to regulate this system.

Source: Phoenix Arizona GOP Debate Dec 7, 1999

Gary Bauer: Large donations buy access and are ďcorruptingĒ

Large contributions from either big labor or big business to the two political parties are corrupting. Itís one thing for somebody to donate $1,000, which is the Federal limit, but when a corporation or a union can write a two million or a five million check to the Republican Party or to the Democratic Party, we all know that that buys access that no average American can meet. So I will support having campaign reform that gets at the special interest in both parties. I think we need to do it.
Source: Phoenix Arizona GOP Debate Dec 7, 1999

John McCain: Drain the big money swamp to kill lobbyist mosquitoes

FORBES [to McCain]: Passing laws against lobbyists is sort of like passing laws against mosquitoes. Washington attracts mosquitoes the way swamps attract mosquitoes. Special interests go there. Donít we need to drain the swamp first to get the mosquitoes out of the way. And donít we have to get rid of the tax code first?

McCAIN: The fact is if you want to drain the swamp, you take the big money away from the big-time K Street lobbyists and that way they lose their power and their influence. Look, anybody who wants the status quo in Washington, they donít want John McCain. Because there ainít going to be the status quo when Iím president of the United States. You take away the big money, youíre going to take away their power and youíre going to break that iron triangle of lobbyists, big money and influence over the legislative process which has so badly embarrassed so many of us and it is the gateway to draining the swamp.

Source: (cross-ref. from Forbes) Phoenix Arizona GOP Debate Dec 7, 1999

Orrin Hatch: McCain-Feingold campaign finance reform is unconstitutional

HATCH [to Keyes]: I have no question in my mind that we need to change the campaign finance system that we have. But I think that the McCain-Feingold bill is unconstitutional because it bars the parties and every public interest organization to use the same money to participate. And it seems to me itís just plain wrong. What do you think about it?

KEYES. All of these approaches are wrong because theyíre based on a premise that I think is unconstitutional. If we have the right of free association, then I think we have the right to associate our money with the causes we believe in, in any amount that we think is necessary to get those causes to work.

HATCH: Amen.

KEYES: For government to step in and for these politicians to be dictating what we can do under that rubric is a total violation of our Constitutional rights. And I think we ought to abandon it. It turns out to be incumbency protection anyway. They will never devise a system that isnít in their own interest.

Source: (cross-ref. to Keyes) Phoenix Arizona GOP Debate Dec 7, 1999

Steve Forbes: Drain the tax code swamp to kill lobbyist mosquitoes

FORBES [to McCain]: Passing laws against lobbyists is sort of like passing laws against mosquitoes. Washington attracts mosquitoes the way swamps attract mosquitoes. Special interests go there. Donít we need to drain the swamp first to get the mosquitoes out of the way. And donít we have to get rid of the tax code first?

McCAIN: The fact is if you want to drain the swamp, you take the big money away from the big-time K Street lobbyists and that way they lose their power and their influence. Look, anybody who wants the status quo in Washington, they donít want John McCain. Because there ainít going to be the status quo when Iím president of the United States. You take away the big money, youíre going to take away their power and youíre going to break that iron triangle of lobbyists, big money and influence over the legislative process which has so badly embarrassed so many of us and it is the gateway to draining the swamp.

Source: (cross-ref. to McCain) Phoenix Arizona GOP Debate Dec 7, 1999

  • The above quotations are from State of Arizona Politicians: Archives.
  • Click here for definitions & background information on Government Reform.
  • Click here for other issues (main summary page).
2020 Presidential contenders on Government Reform:
  Democrats running for President:
Sen.Michael Bennet (D-CO)
V.P.Joe Biden (D-DE)
Mayor Mike Bloomberg (I-NYC)
Gov.Steve Bullock (D-MT)
Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D-IN)
Sen.Cory Booker (D-NJ)
Secy.Julian Castro (D-TX)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Rep.John Delaney (D-MD)
Rep.Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI)
Sen.Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)
Gov.Deval Patrick (D-MA)
Sen.Bernie Sanders (I-VT)
CEO Tom Steyer (D-CA)
Sen.Elizabeth Warren (D-MA)
Marianne Williamson (D-CA)
CEO Andrew Yang (D-NY)

2020 Third Party Candidates:
Rep.Justin Amash (L-MI)
CEO Don Blankenship (C-WV)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Howie Hawkins (G-NY)
Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
Howard Schultz(I-WA)
Gov.Jesse Ventura (I-MN)
Republicans running for President:
Sen.Ted Cruz(R-TX)
Gov.Larry Hogan (R-MD)
Gov.John Kasich(R-OH)
V.P.Mike Pence(R-IN)
Gov.Mark Sanford (R-SC)
Pres.Donald Trump(R-NY)
Rep.Joe Walsh (R-IL)
Gov.Bill Weld(R-MA & L-NY)

2020 Withdrawn Democratic Candidates:
Sen.Stacey Abrams (D-GA)
Mayor Bill de Blasio (D-NYC)
Sen.Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY)
Sen.Mike Gravel (D-AK)
Sen.Kamala Harris (D-CA)
Gov.John Hickenlooper (D-CO)
Gov.Jay Inslee (D-WA)
Mayor Wayne Messam (D-FL)
Rep.Seth Moulton (D-MA)
Rep.Beto O`Rourke (D-TX)
Rep.Tim Ryan (D-CA)
Adm.Joe Sestak (D-PA)
Rep.Eric Swalwell (D-CA)
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