State of Nebraska Archives: on Crime


Peter Ricketts: Build a new, modern correctional facility

By 2025, Nebraska's corrections system is forecasted to house over 6,400 inmates. Today, we have an operational capacity of over 5,300 inmates, and the Nebraska State Penitentiary is decaying. To help protect public safety and to replace the State Penitentiary, I am proposing that we build a new, modern correctional facility. This facility will require an initial investment of $115 million in this budget for a total of $230 million by the time it is completed and operational in 2025.
Source: 2021 State of the State Address to Nebraska legislature Jan 14, 2021

Ben Sasse: Rip up Epstein plea deal; pursue co-conspirators

Sasse wrote a letter urging Attorney General William Barr to "rip up" Jeffrey Epstein's 2008 sweetheart plea agreement, saying that even after his death, the disgraced billionaire's non-prosecution agreement still effectively shielded his co-conspirators from prosecution [for repeated sex offenses]. "Too many of Epstein's secrets have gone to the grave with him, and the Department must not allow his death to be one last sweetheart deal for his co-conspirators," Sasse wrote.
Source: LawAndCrime.com on 2020 Nebraska Senate race Aug 13, 2019

Bob Krist: Repeal death penalty, might make exception for treason

What mattered to him were his core values, he said, including being pro-life, from conception to natural death. He voted to repeal Nebraska's death penalty in 2015, but because of his military background he admits to wrestling with his beliefs about an exception for a death sentence in federal cases for treason against the United States. He knows about the serious consequences of treasonous activity, he said.
Source: The Lincoln Journal-Star on 2022 Nebraska Gubernatorial race Oct 27, 2018

ACLU: Death penalty is a broken process; abolish it nationwide

Nebraska carried out its first execution in more than two decades with the lethal injection of four drugs in a combination never tried before. The Nebraska ACLU released the following statement:

The 38-year-long journey to this execution further proves what we've been saying all along: The ACLU believes the death penalty in America is a broken process from start to finish and should be abolished nationwide. Governor Ricketts has carried out a lethal injection shrouded in secrecy. This execution of Carey Dean Moore does not comport with Nebraska's proud tradition of open government. Today stands as the most recent dark chapter in Nebraska's troubled history with the death penalty. Nebraskans of goodwill have different beliefs about the death penalty, but it is troubling and curious why Governor Ricketts made the death penalty his signature issue. More states are turning away from capital punishment.

Source: KHGI nebraska.tv on 2018 Nebraska gubernatorial race Aug 14, 2018

Peter Ricketts: First NE execution in 20 years, with new drug combination

Nebraska carried out its first execution in more than two decades with the lethal injection of four drugs in a combination never tried before, including the powerful opioid fentanyl.

The execution comes a little more than three years after Nebraska lawmakers abolished the death penalty, only to have it reinstated the following year through a citizen ballot drive partially financed by Gov. Pete Ricketts. The governor has said he was fulfilling the wishes of voters in the conservative state.

The Nebraska drug protocol called for an initial IV dose of diazepam, to render the inmate unconscious; the powerful synthetic opioid fentanyl; cisatracurium besylate to induce paralysis and stop the inmate from breathing; and potassium chloride to stop the heart. After each injection, prison officials sent saline through the IV to flush out any residue and ensure all the drugs had entered the inmate's system. Diazepam, fentanyl and cisatracurium had never been used in executions before.

Source: KHGI nebraska.tv on 2018 Nebraska gubernatorial race Aug 14, 2018

Bob Krist: Fix the prison system; stop the talking about it

I understand the problems with our Department of Corrections. During my time in the Legislature, I've served in numerous leadership positions relating to our prison system. I've repeatedly encouraged the Governor to understand the urgency of finding lasting solutions to fix the prison system. I understand the overtime issue, I understand the overcrowding issue, and I understand that the time for talk is over. The Governor needs to act now and declare an emergency.
Source: 2018 Nebraska Gubernatorial website KristForNebraska.com Dec 12, 2017

Peter Ricketts: Automated sentence calculation for Department of Corrections

[Regarding] the Department of Corrections, we made significant progress in an agency that had been neglected for years. In addition to providing for the basic needs of more than 5,300 inmates, Corrections successfully launched an automated sentence calculation program, implemented the first-ever risks/needs assessment tool, reformed restrictive housing, completed a culture study and staffing analysis, expanded mental health and cognitive behavioral programming, created mission specific housing, and developed an inmate health plan while addressing pay and quality of life issues for Corrections officers.

With this budget proposal, we will reduce protective services vacancy rates, upgrade technology, and improve the Lincoln Correctional Center.

Source: 2017 State of the State address to Nebraska Legislature Jan 12, 2017

Dave Domina: Defended and exonerated death row inmates

In his opening, Domina said he's represented people on death row, and every time he "volunteered to put myself between a Nebraskan and the electric chair" the inmate went home. And when one man he got exonerated didn't have a home to return to, he stayed with Domina, just down the hall from his children.
Source: WatchDog.org on 2014 Nebraska Senate debate Jun 2, 2014

Dave Heineman: Don't reduce sentences automatically for "good time"

An important issue that needs to be addressed is Nebraska's approach to crime and punishment. There are short term and long term components to this issue. Allowing the most violent criminals to enter into our state's prison system and have their judge-imposed sentences automatically reduced by 1/2 through the use of the current "good time" program is not sound public policy. As you know, the current law allows violent criminals to automatically receive "good time" the moment they enter a Nebraska correctional facility. The public safety of our citizens should be priority #1 and that should start with violent criminals being required to earn "good time." I have done all that I can administratively by approving a change to our rules and regulations that allows the Department of Correctional Services to take away twice as much "good time" when a prisoner assaults a corrections official or another inmate.
Source: 2014 State of the State Address to Nebraska legislature Jan 15, 2014

Pat Flynn: Supports "stand-your-ground" self-defense laws

The candidates all declared their support for such conservative platforms as federal spending reductions and repeal of the national health care reform law. They also all stated support for stand-your-ground self-defense laws, which give people latitude to use deadly force rather than retreat from danger. That type of law has been much discussed following the February fatal shooting of an unarmed teenager by a neighborhood watch volunteer in Florida.
Source: Lincoln Journal Star on 2012 Nebraska Senate Debates Apr 14, 2012

Don Stenberg: Supports "stand-your-ground" self-defense laws

The candidates all declared their support for such conservative platforms as federal spending reductions and repeal of the national health care reform law. They also all stated support for stand-your-ground self-defense laws, which give people latitude to use deadly force rather than retreat from danger. That type of law has been much discussed following the February fatal shooting of an unarmed teenager by a neighborhood watch volunteer in Florida.
Source: Lincoln Journal Star on 2012 Nebraska Senate Debates Apr 13, 2012

Jon Bruning: Supports "stand-your-ground" self-defense laws

The candidates all declared their support for such conservative platforms as federal spending reductions and repeal of the national health care reform law. They also all stated support for stand-your-ground self-defense laws, which give people latitude to use deadly force rather than retreat from danger. That type of law has been much discussed following the February fatal shooting of an unarmed teenager by a neighborhood watch volunteer in Florida.
Source: Lincoln Journal Star on 2012 Nebraska Senate Debates Apr 12, 2012

Steven Larrick: Eliminate the federal death penalty

Source: Nebraska Congressional Election 2008 Political Courage Test Jun 25, 2008

Steven Larrick: Prevent criminal behavior rather than focus on punishment

Source: Nebraska Congressional Election 2008 Political Courage Test Jun 25, 2008

Mike Johanns: Supports death penalty for federal crimes

Source: Nebraska Congressional Election 2008 Political Courage Test Jun 3, 2008

Mike Johanns: Juvenile justice package: more funding; more coordination

    I propose a comprehensive juvenile justice reform package that addresses priority needs.
  1. Enact a “gatekeeper” structure to coordinate juveniles’ entry into the State system.
  2. Fund an initiative that will expand the array of services available within the State juvenile system. This measure will alleviate overcrowding by doubling the number of substance abuse treatment beds for juveniles and allow the development of mental health programming and aftercare services.
  3. Create a new aid formula to provide funds directly to counties for development of community-based programs for juvenile delinquents.
  4. Funding to replace expired federal grant dollars so that current substance abuse treatment programs at both Kearney and Geneva can be sustained.
  5. Transfer the existing Department of Correctional Services facility to the Office of Juvenile Services for use as both a Level 5 secure youth treatment facility and as a site for development of a sex offender treatment program.
Source: 2001 State of the State Address to Nebraska Legislature Jan 11, 2001

Jon Bruning: End parole for repeat violent offenders

Source: Nebraska State 2000 National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 2000

Jon Bruning: Supports death penalty by lethal injection in Nebraska

Source: Nebraska State 2000 National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 2000

  • The above quotations are from State of Nebraska Politicians: Archives.
  • Click here for definitions & background information on Crime.
  • Click here for other issues (main summary page).
2020 Presidential contenders on Crime:
  Democrats running for President:
Sen.Michael Bennet (D-CO)
V.P.Joe Biden (D-DE)
Mayor Mike Bloomberg (I-NYC)
Gov.Steve Bullock (D-MT)
Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D-IN)
Sen.Cory Booker (D-NJ)
Secy.Julian Castro (D-TX)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Rep.John Delaney (D-MD)
Rep.Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI)
Sen.Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)
Gov.Deval Patrick (D-MA)
Sen.Bernie Sanders (I-VT)
CEO Tom Steyer (D-CA)
Sen.Elizabeth Warren (D-MA)
Marianne Williamson (D-CA)
CEO Andrew Yang (D-NY)

2020 Third Party Candidates:
Rep.Justin Amash (L-MI)
CEO Don Blankenship (C-WV)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Howie Hawkins (G-NY)
Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
Howard Schultz(I-WA)
Gov.Jesse Ventura (I-MN)
Republicans running for President:
Sen.Ted Cruz(R-TX)
Gov.Larry Hogan (R-MD)
Gov.John Kasich(R-OH)
V.P.Mike Pence(R-IN)
Gov.Mark Sanford (R-SC)
Pres.Donald Trump(R-NY)
Rep.Joe Walsh (R-IL)
Gov.Bill Weld(R-MA & L-NY)

2020 Withdrawn Democratic Candidates:
Sen.Stacey Abrams (D-GA)
Mayor Bill de Blasio (D-NYC)
Sen.Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY)
Sen.Mike Gravel (D-AK)
Sen.Kamala Harris (D-CA)
Gov.John Hickenlooper (D-CO)
Gov.Jay Inslee (D-WA)
Mayor Wayne Messam (D-FL)
Rep.Seth Moulton (D-MA)
Rep.Beto O`Rourke (D-TX)
Rep.Tim Ryan (D-CA)
Adm.Joe Sestak (D-PA)
Rep.Eric Swalwell (D-CA)
Please consider a donation to OnTheIssues.org!
Click for details -- or send donations to:
1770 Mass Ave. #630, Cambridge MA 02140
E-mail: submit@OnTheIssues.org
(We rely on your support!)

Page last updated: Oct 13, 2021